September 27, 2017

Construction jobs of the future

78735080_SNew technologies are making our day-to-day lives easier all the time, and it’s no different in the world of construction.

You might think positions like a construction worker, crane operator, or brick layer are all that the industry has to offer, but that’s no longer the case. If you are passionate about technology and love creative thinking, here are three positions in the industry that are worth looking into.

Drone operator. Do you love flying drones on the weekends? Do you regularly shoot video off of your own personal drone? What if you could do the very same thing and get paid for it? Construction companies all over the world are using drones to keep tabs on projects, look for safety hazards, and provide aerial photographs and data. Commercial drone schools are popping up in order to meet the demand for training. If you already know how to fly a drone, you could use those skills and convert them into a lucrative career.

3D-printing expert. 3D-printing is making manufacturing and construction work easier and quicker than ever before. Rather than waiting weeks or months for molds to be made or building materials to be delivered, 3D-printers are allowing construction teams to print parts and materials in just a few hours while on-site.

Augmented reality developer. Augmented and virtual reality is giving architects and engineers access to the structures that they’re building before they’ve even started construction. Graphic design experts are responsible for taking measurements and turning them into a living, breathing projection. Sounds pretty cool, right?

The construction industry is no longer just about manual labor. There is so much opportunity when it comes to technology and electronics. The future is bright. Will you be taking advantage?


March 10, 2017

Construction is on64618125_Se of the few industries in which you can regularly see the fruits of your labor.

More often than not, work in the corporate business world requires individuals to repeat menial tasks over-and-over again, without ever seeing the “big picture”. This is especially true in industries like finance, technology and computer programming where results and progress are based on numbers, figures and earning reports, rather than project completion. Working toward abstract concepts like improved algorithms and more efficient network communications are well and good, but if you’re someone that craves a sense of finality or structure, work in a cubicle farm might just not be your thing.Construction is completely opposite, in that day-in-and-day-out you’re able to see your hard work come to life. Whether you’re a carpenter working on a housing frame, or a metal fabricator prepping HVAC equipment, at the end of the day, you have something to show for what you’ve done. The work is more physically demanding, and it requires teamwork, communication and coordination, but it feels great knowing that you’ve contributed to something that’s both greater than the parts, and will last for years to come. If you want to be able to reach out and touch the result of your labor, there’s no better place to do it than construction-related work. To find out more about the industry, just follow this link. An exciting future awaits.

 


Stayton High Kicks Off “Careers in Construction” Month

Build-Oregon logoThe 2016–2017 school year is in full swing, and October is officially “Careers in Construction” month! Friday, September 30th marked the official kickoff of a month packed with Willamette ESD and Build-Oregon high school career events throughout the Willamette Valley.  Hosted by Stayton High School, the event boasted around 500 students and educators from Stayton, Regis, Cascade, and Jefferson High Schools.

If you were a student in attendance at the Stayton event, and you stopped by the Build-Oregon booth, don’t miss your chance to win a $100 Amazon gift card! Visit our website www.build-oregon.com to fill out a short survey and you’ll be entered to win. It’s that easy! Make sure to follow us on Twitter (@buildoregon), since we’ll be announcing the winner there too.

While you’re on the website, make sure to check out all of the resources about careers in construction.  An estimated 30,000 new construction workers will be needed in Oregon by 2020, and that could be YOU! High wages, high demand, lots of different career choices.  The choice is up to you!

 


S-PACE Camp Highlights: June-July 2016

Check out the recent activities at the 2016 S-PACE Camp events with Portland Public and David Douglas School Districts


2016 NW Youth Career Expo a Huge Hit with Students!

More than 6,000 students from 70+ high schools visited the Oregon Convention Center on Wednesday, February 24, for the 12th annual Youth Career Expo. We’re especially grateful to the many employers and volunteers who participated, filling 160 booths and packing the hall with hands-on demonstrations.

Read more about the expo from our friends at Portland Workforce Alliance

SEE MORE PHOTOS FROM THE EXPO


A career as a heat and frost insulator might be right up your alley.

Worker thermally insulating a house attic using mineral wool

Insulation is part of our every-day-lives, but if you aren’t aware of it, it’s easy to miss. It’s the substance that keeps us warm in the winter and cool in the summer, and it isn’t just in homes. Refineries, buildings and even industrial plants require various kinds of insulation in order to keep their facilities running. If you want to get your foot-in-the-door when it comes to construction work, starting as an insulator is a great decision.

Working conditions as an insulator are a bit rougher than those of the average construction worker. You’re constantly exposed to dust and other tiny particles, so it’s often required that you wear a respirator and goggles to protect your eyes and lungs. You’ll usually work in confined or tight spaces, which can mean lots of climbing, ducking and squeezing too. In short: The more flexible you are, the better.

All you need to get started as an insulator is to be 18-years-old and a GED or highschool diploma. A great way to get started working as an insulator is by participating in an apprenticeship program. There are a number of these in the area, but they do require an extensive number of hours on the job.

Working as an insulator will also give you the opportunity to move up in the construction field, as well as time to learn about insulation and how structures benefit from this seemingly menial task. For more information on this exciting career option, click here.


Worried that graduation is right around the corner? Set a New Year’s resolution of laying down a career path.

ew years resolution against anxious student

Are you a high school senior that will be graduating in 2016? If so, it’s time to start planning for your future, and there’s no better time to do so than right now. Why? Because the new year is right around the corner, and such an occasion calls for resolutions. Here’s why considering what lies ahead is so important.

Have you ever gone into a math test thinking “I didn’t study at all for this…awesome!!” Of course not! When we aren’t prepared for things we feel anxious, pressured and our thoughts get muddled. This principle applies to real life as well. The more you think about your future and take steps toward achieving your goals, the better chance you’ll have at reaching them. If you don’t plan on attending college after graduation, now is a great time to start laying out a career path, and the construction industry is one of the best places to get started.

Even if you don’t know exactly what you want to do, now is the perfect time to try different things. Sign up for an apprenticeship, join a local meetup or see if you can shadow a family member or older friend. This gives you both experience, and items that will stand out on your resume.

Another benefit of construction work is the pay and benefits associated with the jobs in the field. In fact, a number of jobs make an average of over $50 thousand or more per year. Assignments are often flexible, and you can always move onto something else once one wraps up.

As you make your list of resolutions this month, don’t forget to add ‘planning for the future’ to the list. Need help getting started? Contact the team at Build Oregon today.


This Thanksgiving be thankful for construction.

 

Thanksgiving holiday greeting cardTrying to think of something to be thankful for this Thanksgiving season? Why not start with construction? If it weren’t for the hard work of contractors in Oregon and elsewhere, we wouldn’t have roads to drive on, bridges to get over water with or even homes to live in. The hard work of countless men and women in our industry is on display every day. Just look around you.

Imagine a world where there were no roads, sidewalks, homes or buildings. Things would look a lot different, wouldn’t they? There wouldn’t be protection from the wind and rain, we wouldn’t have a roof over our heads when we sleep at night and there wouldn’t be any elaborate stadiums to watch our favorite sports teams from. At the end of the day, our society really revolves around a lot of aspects that are tied directly to the construction industry.

Finding yourself feeling a little cynical or unappreciative this holiday season? Just remember that we’d be in a lot different boat if it wasn’t for all of the innovation and creativity that workers in the construction field do every day. It’s pretty amazing, and something that’s worth checking into. It might even be your calling. Happy Thanksgiving from all of us at Build Oregon!


Now is the perfect time to enter the construction field in Oregon.

October 15, 2015

uthentic construction worker placing slab formwork beams in construction site

The AGC of America recently released a report that found that contractors all over the country are having trouble finding and hiring qualified workers for important construction jobs. What does that mean? Opportunity, that’s what! Here’s a breakdown of the report and how it can benefit you and your career.

Positions in demand. All kinds of construction positions are in high demand, especially in Oregon. 88% of those companies surveyed are having trouble finding carpenters, 75% of them can’t find cement masons, iron workers and electricians, while 60% are struggling to hire mechanics. Regardless of your own personal interests, if you’re willing to learn a trade you’ll be able to find work.

It’s a good time get hired. A number of Oregon-based construction industry professionals are currently hiring and will continue to do so over the next 12 months. In fact, 85% of those surveyed expected to hire hourly craft workers during the next year and 59% of those companies surveyed said they’d be increasing the number of salary level position at their places of work too.

Construction isn’t going anywhere. If there’s one thing that’s for certain, it’s that construction isn’t going anywhere. Businesses are investing in land and buying up properties and the demand for skilled workers is only going to continue to increase.

Start working toward your future today by visiting Build-Oregon.com. There are plenty of resources to get you involved in rewarding work that you will love.

Did you know these three construction careers have an earning potential over $50,000 a year?

 

Two workers bending sheet metal with a large machine

The construction industry hasn’t always been associated with competitive wages or great benefits, but it really should be.

There are a number of positions in the field that make over $50,000 a year, and the earning potential only increases as you learn more and move your way up the ladder. Here’s a look at three jobs with great earning potential you might not have considered.

Sheet Metal Worker. Sheet Metal Workers do everything from welding and shaping metals to roofing, construction and repair of HVAC systems. They’re even responsible for stainless steel set-ups at hospitals and industrial kitchens. Work is sometimes performed in a warehouse, and at other times, a job calls for a welder on the job site. The scenery is constantly changing, and the work is always different. Follow the link to find out more.

Plumber. Everybody needs a plumber. At large corporations and residential homes alike, pipes leak, fixtures break and hot-water heaters go kaput. Fortunately, these wizards of the industry know how to address such common problems as well as not-so-common ones such as meeting building codes and battling faulty garbage disposals. A great way to get started is by picking up an apprenticeship, and Oregon is full of opportunity.

Ironworker. You know those buildings you pass every day on your way to work? They wouldn’t exist if it weren’t for the ironworkers who laid the steal beams, or skeleton, of the structure and made sure everything was welded together properly. These guys do it all, from installing intricate window frames 10 stories above the city floor to sealing connecting bars with oxy-acetylene torches. If you like getting a little dirty, this one’s for you.

Want to learn about more professions in the construction industry? Visit Build-Oregon.com today to find out what fits your personality and work style best.

 

Interested in a career in construction?

September 17, 2015

The best way to get your foot in the door is to actively participate in career-focused programs such as those provided by Portland YouthBuilders.

 

 

Did you just graduate from high school? Still not sure what you want to do next?

September 7, 2015

Getting a college degree isn't for everyone. This video does a wonderful job of illustrating the topic.

 

A 9-to-5 job in an office isn't for everyone.

August 26

There's a lot of opportunity in the world of construction. Here's one teen's story, as told by his mom.

 
Mary McQueen talks to parents about the experience of her son choosing to attend a Career and Technical Education program for welding. Find out more about th...
youtube.com

 

If you’re going to watch something, it might as well be educational

Now that school's out for the summer, you're probably spending quite a bit of your time online. Although YouTube has plenty of entertaining videos to offer, cats playing keyboards and best blooper compilations don't necessarily have any... (Read more)

How to flex your earning potential in the construction industry

Just like in any other industry, everything in construction is tied to how hard you work and how good you are at your job. But the average salaries in Oregon’s construction industry are competitive with other industries right out of the gate, and... (Read more)

 

Increase your construction knowledge by volunteering this summer

School's out for summer and the weather is grand, but how are you going to fill your time? Have you considered participating in a volunteer program? Not only will it add to your resume (and help you stand out in the crowd), it'll also teach you... (Read more)
 
 

Apply through June 15 for the AGC Foundation Workforce Development Scholarship

Now through June 15, Oregon students are encouraged to apply for the AGC of America Education and Research Foundation Workforce Development Scholarship. The program is open to students pursuing a variety of educational paths, including tech schools... (Read more)
 
 

Go inside the Building Girls Summer Construction Camp happening this August

Women are an essential part of the construction industry, a fact celebrated by the upcoming Building Girls Summer Construction Camp here in Oregon. A few key facts highlight the importance of women in construction. For example, a 2010 report by... (Read more)
 
 
 

Why we’re celebrating Safety Awareness Month this May

Did you know the construction industry is the safest it has ever been? That’s reason to celebrate, which is why our entire team at Build-Oregon.com marks each May as Construction Safety Month. If you’ve ever driven past a work site or seen... (Read more)
 

Construction myths we love to debunk

 

Mason holds a helmet on a background of a brick wall

Forget what you think you know about those poor guys scraping by in construction. First off, many of them aren’t guys at all. The person putting finishing touches on electrical wiring in a new building? In Oregon, he or she averages more than $69,000 per year. The bricklayer who gets to wear comfy denim overalls all day? He’s averaging $29.69 per hour. That’s $61,747 yearly.

As for the perception that construction is filled with a bunch of uneducated low-skilled workers, we love to point out that many of the people in the industry are engineers with advanced degrees, accountants, customer relations professionals and skilled craftworkers. In fact, some of the very people who start out pulling nails from boards, if they pay attention and work hard, end up running construction companies later in life.

 
 
 

Construction brings better work-life balance

One of the nice things about construction is that you can’t take a 12-story concrete and steel structure home and keep working on it. When you’re working, you’re working, but when you’re off, you can play as hard as you work, at night and on... (Read more)

Are you construction material?

No matter what you do, you benefit from the construction industry. You live in a house or apartment or building that someone built. You drive or bike or walk on roads and over bridges that had to be designed and built by people in the construction... (Read more)

 

2015 NW Youth Career Expo a huge success!

The annual NW Youth Careers Expo is the Northwest’s premier career-education event, attended by more than 5,000 students and more than 135 employers. It shows students the amazing diversity of career opportunities in our region, as well as the skills and education needed to pursue those jobs. See the Portland Workforce Alliance blog for photos, highlights, media coverage and more!

Construction jobs of the future

 

September 27, 2017

78735080_S

New technologies are making our day-to-day lives easier all the time, and it’s no different in the world of construction.

The tangible benefits of construction work

64618125_SConstruction is one of the few industries in which you can regularly see the fruits of your labor.

Stayton High Kicks Off “Careers in Construction” Month

Build-Oregon logoThe 2016–2017 school year is in full swing, and October is officially “Careers in Construction” month! Friday, September 30th marked the official kickoff of a month packed with Willamette ESD and Build-Oregon high school career events throughout the Willamette Valley.  Hosted by Stayton High School, the event boasted around 500 students and educators from Stayton, Regis, Cascade, and Jefferson High Schools.

S-PACE Camp Highlights: June-July 2016

Check out the recent activities at the 2016 S-PACE Camp events with Portland Public and David Douglas School Districts

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